Advancing Automation Means Humans Need to Embrace Lifelong Learning

Jeremy Auger, the chief strategy officer for Tweney Media client D2L, wrote a piece that appeared in Entrepreneur this week:

With the advancement of artificial intelligence technologies, automation is still replacing humans, only it’s now happening the cognitive space as well as the physical one.

…According to University of Oxford researchers, 47 percent of workers may  be at risk of losing their jobs to automation, in particular those in mid-skilled retail jobs, and office workers like cashiers and telemarketers. A recent McKinsey report predicted that a smaller percentage of jobs would be at risk of being completely replaced by machines, but pointed out that the majority of jobs would see some of their tasks replaced by automation.

In other words, we’re all going to feel the impact of AI in some way. And our skills aren’t keeping pace.

Read the rest: Advancing Automation Means Humans Need to Embrace Lifelong Learning

Electrospray—A Powerful Third Option for Electric Satellite Propulsion

Accion Systems founder/CEO Natalya Bailey and team member Raleigh Werner contributed this article about electric satellite propulsion systems to SatMagazine. That’s right: These are propulsion systems for orbiting satellites that are powered by electricity, not by burning chemicals.

Tweney Media helped Accion produce this article, along with a second piece that appeared in Aerospace & Defense Tech Magazine. The latter piece also included illustrations by Zina Deretsky, who worked with us for this project.

 

Electric propulsion systems for satellites have been in commercial use for decades—primarily Hall-effect thrusters and gridded ion engines—but their adoption in the market has been constrained on account of their high costs, inability to scale down to smaller designs, and performance limitations.

However, a third approach—electrospray technology—could put electric propulsion on a much more competitive footing for a wide variety of space applications, from constellations of small satellites to manned interplanetary missions.

Source: SatMagazine

A Deep Dive into Hexadite’s Founding, Growth, and Acquisition by Microsoft 

Yoav Leitersdorf just published a long read about Hexadite’s startup journey, from its founding three years ago to last week’s acquisition by Microsoft. It’s not often you get to see so much of a startup’s inside story.

Since we were there from the earliest days, we’d like to share some anecdotes and insights that show how special this team is. We also want to share this story so other entrepreneurs can see more of what goes on behind the scenes at a successful enterprise technology startup. Starting a company can be a long journey filled with challenges of all kinds. It helps to understand what is really happening, not just what gets written about in the news after a funding round or an acquisition closes.

Read the rest: A Deep Dive into Hexadite’s Founding, Growth, and Acquisition by Microsoft | Yoav Leitersdorf | Pulse | LinkedIn

After a cyberattack, companies remain vulnerable. What CIOs can do to protect their brands

In this column, ValiMail CEO Alexander García-Tobar discusses an aspect of security crisis communications that most companies overlook: Making sure that customers can actually trust the emails that the recently breached company is trying to send them.

In light of the recent OneLogin and DocuSign security breaches, that’s particularly pertinent, he writes:

Here’s a security scenario that’s all too common: A company suffers from a cyberattack, then responds to it promptly and alerts its customers, warning them to change their passwords. But the company remains vulnerable through the very means it uses to alert those customers: Email. In fact, attackers can exploit that vulnerability using email that pretends to be a security warning from the company, targeting customers and wreaking even more damage.

Keep reading: After a cyberattack, companies remain vulnerable. What CIOs can do to protect their brands | CIO

Ransomware Outbreak Underscores the Need for Increasingly Essential Cybersecurity Practices | Security Magazine

Hacker says: Pay

ValiMail CEO Alexander García-Tobar takes a hard look at the root cause of the recent ransomware scare known as WannaCry.

The ransomware crisis that swept the world last month highlights what we’ve known for years: The global IT infrastructure is incredibly vulnerable. …

However, media coverage of the attack has largely overlooked how this malware gets onto a computer in the first place. These attacks were almost certainly initiated by phish emails, and the recommendations to prevent WannaCry from the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) confirm this.

The risk from phishing attacks can be greatly mitigated using proven email authentication standards that are supported by the world’s largest senders of email. But most enterprises have not yet implemented email authentication.

Read the whole story: Ransomware Outbreak Underscores the Need for Increasingly Essential Cybersecurity Practices | 2017-05-31 | Security Magazine

The South Ender Spring 2017 Newsletter

We took on the challenge of redesigning and editing the quarterly print newsletter of the South End Rowing Club, a nonprofit athletic club in San Francisco that was founded in 1873.

The club offers swimming, handball, running, and rowing, as well as a beautiful, new gym and a new women’s locker room. Dylan has been a member since 2016 and was approached about taking the helm of the newsletter earlier this year, as a pro bono project.

We worked with a designer in Los Angeles to redesign the newsletter, creating a fresh new layout that would feature photos more prominently and allow inclusion of more and longer stories, while preserving readability. Simultaneously, we sourced articles from a large cross section of the membership, edited them, selected images, and organized everything into a single 24-page issue. Copy editor Kim Hedges ensured everything was free of typos and grammatical problems.

The end result has been getting rave reviews from the South End membership and its president.

2017.05 South Ender_color Spring 2017 (pdf)

To stop future ransomware hacks, CIOs first need to ‘swat the mosquitoes’

Imagine if health officials, after discovering that the Zika virus was spreading rapidly across the globe, only focused on human-to-human transmission of the virus, and never mentioned the mosquitos that were actually the main cause of the virus.

In the case of the malicious WannaCry hack, reports vary as to the original source — we may never know.  But in the majority of infections, the “mosquitos” are the email messages — specifically, phish or spam — that appear to be a message you’d be interested in from someone you trust, but are in fact fraudulent messages sent by hackers.

Continue reading: To stop future ransomware hacks, CIOs first need to ‘swat the mosquitoes’ | CIO

Tech companies overlook a key CEO talent pool: Sales

Only 8 percent of the CEOs nation’s 100 largest tech firms have primary backgrounds in sales, and less than 30 percent of them have any sales experience at all.

“Companies are missing an important pool of top talent to consider for the CEO role,” says Rick Sklarin, senior client partner in Korn Ferry’s Global Technology practice and author of the report, “From sales executive to CEO: lessons on the journey.”

Tweney Media helped Korn Ferry produce this in-depth, 12-page white paper, and the result is pretty slick. Check it out on Korn Ferry’s website.

We’ll only run out of jobs if the world runs out of problems to solve

We don’t have a jobs issue, we have a skills issue and a geography issue, argues Stephane Kasriel, the CEO of Tweney Media client Upwork.

In this contributed article, which appeared on Quartz, Kasriel takes on the mismatch of skills between companies and would-be workers, and suggests a possible solution: Companies need to start looking for talent beyond their immediate, urban-core headquarters.

Our workforce is going through unprecedented change. You can see the results of this change in the headlines every day: old jobs becoming obsolete, factories closing, companies moving divisions to lower cost areas, and voters reacting with frustration and anger. At the same time, innovation is progressing faster than ever in an attempt to keep up with the world’s problems and their necessary solutions.

Read the rest: We’ll only run out of jobs if the world runs out of problems to solve

What responsibility does PR have to the dying media? | PR Week

With the media undeniably in crisis, what responsibility do communications professionals have? Dylan published this op-ed in PRWeek on February 28, offering two options: Be like Donny, or be more useful.

Option two: Double down on the idea that PR and the press have a symbiotic, mutually beneficial relationship. Too often communications pros give lip service to this idea but don’t actually deliver. Instead, take the role as a facilitator seriously and figure out how you can help the journalists you talk to, not just your clients.

Read the article: What responsibility does PR have to the dying media? | PR Week